Ankle Fractures

What Is an Ankle Fracture?

A fracture is a partial or complete break in a bone. Fractures in the ankle can range from the less serious avulsion injuries (small pieces of bone that have been pulled off) to severe shattering-type breaks of the tibia, fibula, or both.

Ankle fractures are common injuries that are most often caused by the ankle rolling inward or outward. Many people mistake an ankle fracture for an ankle sprain, but they are quite different and therefore require an accurate and early diagnosis. They sometimes occur simultaneously.

Symptoms
An ankle fracture is accompanied by one or all of these symptoms:

  • Pain at the site of the fracture, which in some cases can extend from the foot to the knee
  • Significant swelling, which may occur along the length of the leg or may be more localized
  • Blisters may occur over the fracture site. These should be promptly treated by a foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Bruising that develops soon after the injury
  • Inability to walk—however, it is possible to walk with less severe breaks, so never rely on walking as a test of whether a bone has been fractured
  • Change in the appearance of the ankle – it will look different from the other ankle
  • Bone protruding through the skin—a sign that immediate care is needed. Fractures that pierce the skin require immediate attention because they can lead to severe infection and prolonged recovery.

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Diagnosis
Following an ankle injury it is important to have the ankle evaluated by a foot and ankle surgeon for proper diagnosis and treatment. If you are unable to do so right away, go to the emergency room and then follow up with a foot and ankle surgeon as soon as possible for a more thorough assessment.

The affected limb will be examined by the foot and ankle surgeon by touching specific areas to evaluate the injury. In addition, the surgeon may order x-rays and other imaging studies, as necessary.

Non-Surgical Treatment
Treatment of ankle fractures depends upon the type and severity of the injury. At first, the foot and ankle surgeon will want you to follow the R.I.C.E. protocol:

  • Rest: Stay off the injured ankle. Walking may cause further injury.
  • Ice: Apply an ice pack to the injured area, placing a thin towel between the ice and the skin. Use ice for 20 minutes and then wait at least 40 minutes before icing again.
  • Compression: An elastic wrap should be used to control swelling.
  • Elevation: The ankle should be raised slightly above the level of your heart to reduce swelling.

Additional treatment options include:

  • Immobilization. Certain fractures are treated by protecting and restricting the ankle and foot in a cast or splint. This allows the bone to heal.
  • Prescription medications. To help relieve the pain, the surgeon may prescribe pain medications or anti-inflammatory drugs.

When is Surgery Needed?
For some ankle fractures, surgery is needed to repair the fracture and other soft tissue related injuries, if present. The foot and ankle surgeon will select the procedure that is appropriate for your injury.

Follow-up Care
It is important to follow your surgeon’s instructions after treatment. Failure to do so can lead to infection, deformity, arthritis, and chronic pain.


Trauma & Injuries


Urgent Access & Walk-in Hours

FAAWC understands the challenge of finding foot and ankle care that is quickly accessible. That's why we offer emergency/urgent appointments on an as-needed basis. Please call 740-363-4373 for availability. From noon to 3 p.m. Fridays, FAAWC is open for ANY walk-in patients who do not have a scheduled appointment.


Dr. Anderson: Foot and Ankle Trauma

Sports Injuries Many sports are hard on the feet because of quick and repetitive movements, constricting footwear and/or increased exposure to injury or trauma.

Shin Splints Pain on either side of the leg bone that is caused by muscle or tendon inflammation.

Broken Ankle Can involve one or more of the bones, as well as injury to the surrounding connecting tissues or ligaments.

Ankle Sprains Caused by an unnatural twisting or force on the ankle bones of the foot, which may result in excessive stretching or tearing of one or more ligaments on the outside of the ankle.

Stress Fractures Incomplete cracks in bone caused by overuse. With complete rest, stress fractures in toes or any bones of the foot heal quickly. Extra padding in shoes can help prevent the condition. Left untreated, stress fractures may become complete bone fractures, which require casting and immobilization.

Chronic Lateral Ankle Pain Recurring or chronic pain on the outside part of the ankle that often develops after an injury such as a sprained ankle.

Osteochondritis (stiff ankle) A lesion that usually causes pain and stiffness of the ankle joint and affects all age groups. Osteochondritis is caused by a twisting-type injury to the ankle.

Osteochondromas Benign bone tumors that form in the bone beneath the toenail. Osteochrondromas account for about half of all benign bone tumors, and they occur mostly in children and young adults.

Learn more about selecting the proper athletic shoes with our athletic shoe guidelines.