Blog

Posts for: November, 2017

Happy Thanksgiving! On this festive day of overindulgence we give thanks for everything we have in our lives… And then 12 hours later we go out and fight to acquire more things. If you’re already thinking of your holiday shopping list, make sure you put some gifts for your feet on there. For example…

SOCKS

Most people assume that when they get socks as a present the gifter didn’t really know what to get them, but socks can truly be a fabulous idea as a gift! Maybe you’re surprising your kids with rock climbing lessons - buy them some footie socks to wear in their rock climbing shoes. Maybe you’re whisking off you spouse to an elaborate vacation - get them some compression hose to wear on the plane so when you land they’ll be ready to see the sights with no leg pain. Maybe your family and friends just like sitting around playing video games - get them some fuzzy socks to keep their feet toasty on the couch this winter. Whatever you might want to give someone, there’s probably a corresponding sock to go with it. If you really want to have some fun, have them open the socks first (they will probably feign happiness for a few minutes), then give them the rest of the present and watch them realize that the socks were actually the perfect gift to go with it.

 

 

FOOT PAMPERING

 

People tend to neglect their feet which is sad since they tend to do all the work of carrying us around all day. Treat your feet to something special with a little foot papering at the FAAWC. Gift certificates to our PediCare salon are readily available and can be purchased over the phone or in person at our office. If your gift recipient is out of town, send them a home care package with some Baby Feet foot peel and some colorful anti-fungal nail polish. Taking care of your foot health never felt so decadent!

 

WALKING ACCESSORIES

You can still promote good foot health without a directly foot-related gift. Getting your family and friends out into the world to be active can be a wonderful gift that promotes overall health, but can also benefit your feet. Step counters are getting more and more sophisticated and fashionable. Help someone walk their way to better health by encouraging them to get outside or to the gym and get moving. This can help maintain a healthy body weight which in turn helps your feet. You can also go for other sporting goods that encourage activity - hiking pants, basketballs or footballs, even a swimsuit for summer fun. All of these things lead to a healthier and active lifestyle. Just make sure that they also have the correct shoes for whatever activity you are leading them into, otherwise you may have to offer a belated gift of a trip to the podiatrist.

 

Get creative with your gift giving and don’t settle for just handing out cash. We promise, with a gift from the FAAWC, you’ll never be disappointed with a gift of socks again.


This Saturday we celebrate Veteran’s Day, a day to show appreciation for all the men and women in our armed forces who risk their lives for our freedom and safety. Unfortunately, veterans are also sacrificing their foot health for us. One study found that “flatfoot deformity and arthritis were significantly more prevalent in veterans versus nonveterans” (https://goo.gl/WX88Uo). In addition, male veterans have significantly more bunion deformities than male nonveterans and female veterans were more likely to suffer sprains. The goal of the study was to form guidelines for soldiers to help prevent these common veteran foot problems. Whether you’re a soldier or not, let’s take a look at how to prevent these common podiatric problems.

 

Flatfoot Deformity

It’s possible for your feet to go flat of your own doing. This is called Acquired Adult Flatfoot Deformity (AAFD). There is no single cause for this deformity; it occurs from the daily wear and tear of walking and running, which soldiers certainly do a lot of. As we walk, the posterior tibial tendon (the one that connects the calf muscle to the bones on the inside of the foot) rolls our foot inward and keeps our arches raised. If we overuse this tendon, our feet can go flat. Proper arch support through insoles, orthotics, and choosing good footwear is the best prevention method for this deformity.

 

Arthritis

There are over 100 different forms of arthritis, but soldiers are particularly susceptible to two of these: osteoarthritis and post-traumatic arthritis. Osteoarthritis occurs from the slow disintegration of the protective layer between our bones. It can take a lot to make this happen, but veterans have been through a lot. Post-traumatic arthritis generally occurs as a result of other foot injuries such as dislocations and fractures, which soldiers suffer plenty of. The best way to avoid giving yourself arthritis is to keep your weight down, wear supportive shoes, and exercise your feet. If you’re just standing around, get into a light lunge and stretch that Achilles tendon. Try picking up things with your toes to keep your joints mobile and healthy.

 

Bunions

If you want to get technical, a deformity of the bone at the base of your big toe is called hallux valgus, but know them better as bunions. Bunions are tricky suckers because doctors still don’t know the exact cause. Some bunions can form from trauma, others are blamed on genetics, while still others can form from abnormal biomechanics. Shoes don’t directly cause bunions, but podiatrists still agree that a good prevention method is to wear shoes with a wide toe box that avoid squeezing the big toe out of alignment. The only other prevention method is to make sure you see your podiatrist regularly and especially if you experience any pain or visible deformity of your joint.

 

Sprains

Female service members were found to be more likely than non-military females to suffer from chronic ankle sprains. Luckily, there are a lot of prevention methods for avoiding these injuries. Keeping your foot, ankle, and calf muscles strong can allow for better control over our gait and thus help us maintain a proper stride. If you know you are going to be active and you are susceptible to ankle sprains, you may consider wearing a supportive ankle brace or learning some new taping techniques on your next podiatrist visit. As with all health issues, it helps to maintain a healthy weight and get all your vitamins and minerals to strengthen bones and keep you going without injury.

 

Don’t forget to thank a veteran this Saturday. His or her feet have done a lot for you.


The MLB season just ended with a stunning Championship win by the Houston Astros, but the hitting, throwing, running, and catching of 7 baseball games can really do a number on a player’s joints and lead to tendonitis in several different areas. While most of this tendonitis occurs in the shoulders, elbows, and wrists the symptoms and treatments are the same as if it occurred in your feet.

Tendonitis is an overuse injury brought on by a repeated motion that leaves joints, muscles, and of course tendons strained and weak. This can occur as it’s own injury or along with an acute injury, but tendonitis is definitely more common in athletes and especially older athletes. Our tendons lose elasticity as we get older (like a rubber band wears out), so the more we use it, the faster this may happen. Tendons connect muscle to bone and work between both, absorbing and releasing energy on both sides to move the parts of our bodies. Because they experience the stress you put on your bones and the strain you put on your muscles, tendons are very prone to damage.

Usual symptoms for tendonitis include general and achy pain, swelling, and tenderness. If these symptoms happen once they can be easily treated with RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). However, if a player develops tendonitis they would feel theses symptoms all the time and a chronic condition will develop. The longer this goes on the bigger chance there is of a sudden rupture.

There are over 100 tendons in your legs, ankles, and feet so tendonitis has many places to manifest. The most common types of tendonitis in the feet are:

Achilles Tendonitis: Pain between the heel and the calf

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis: Pain on the inner side of the foot

Peroneal Tendonitis: Pain on the outer ankle

Extensor Tendontis: Pain on the top of the foot

Anterior Tibial Tendinitis: Pain at the front of you foot

Whether you play baseball with your kids in the backyard or you’re walking onto the field for the playoffs, repeated overuse can lead to chronic pain. See your podiatrist today if you continue to have pain in one area. We’re here to keep you in the game!