Avoid Pump Bump!

Ladies, many of us love to wear heels, and why not? Heels can be empowering and make us feel sexy and Amazonian (especially if you’re on the shorter side). But do we really know what those heels are doing to our feet? Among the myriad of problems associated with high heels, let’s look at Haglund’s Deformity also known as “Pump Bump”.

In some ways this is a misnomer, since Haglund’s Deformity can occur in both men and women and from many types of shoes. The “bump” is true though. Haglund’s Deformity is an enlarged bump on the bone of the heel. When this bump rubs against a hard surface (like the back of a stiff high heel or a structured men’s dress shoe) it irritates the bursa next to your Achilles tendon. An inflamed bursa causes bursitis, which is a painful condition brought on by repeated stress to a single area.

READ MORE: Bursitis

People who have high arches, tight Achilles tendons, or a tendency to walk on the outside of their heel are more predisposed to have Haglund’s Deformity. If you develop this deformity, you will know by the pain, swelling, and redness surrounding a noticeable bump on the back of your heel.

Haglund’s Deformity can be diagnosed with a simple doctor visit and x-ray. Most cases of Haglund’s Deformity are treatable with anti-inflammatory medications, heel pads, heel lifts, ice, stretching exercises, orthotics, or physical therapy. If these methods don’t provide relief, surgical options may be considered.

The best way to protect your feet from Haglund’s Deformity is to avoid wearing shoes with stiff backs that press on your heel. I’m not saying that you can never wear your favorite pumps again, but it may be a good idea to cut down on the amount of time you wear them. Consider wearing flats to and from the office or party or switching it up with a cute backless heel that will avoid putting pressure on the same area. Heels are cute; “Pump Bump” is not. Protect your feet with proper shoes and treatment from the FAAWC.

READ MORE: High Heels and Neuromas

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