Heel Spurs

You may have seen the title of this blog and thought of the pointed wheels worn by cowboys on their boots to urge a horse forward. Yes, those are also called spurs, but a Heel Spur is different. Your bones are constantly being repaired and strengthened by your body to keep up with the stresses of everyday activity, but when this process goes awry, it can leave odd-shaped calcium deposits on the exterior of the bone. If this happens to your heels, it's a heel spur. The deposit may be pointed and sharp or it could be flat and barely noticeable. It could cause intense pain or have no symptoms at all. Generalized pain in the heel needs to be evaluated by a podiatrist since there are many causes.

 

Plantar Fasciitis

This is one of the most common conditions associated with heel spurs. The plantar fascia is a strong band of tissue along the bottom of the foot that connects the heel bone to the toes. When the plantar fascia is damaged, your body sends a message to your heel to strengthen the bone to make up for lost support. A heel spur brought on by plantar fasciitis forms on the underside of the bone and if it becomes prominent enough, you may begin to feel it like a lump in your shoe. About 50% of all heel spurs form as a result of plantar fasciitis, according to the Mayo Clinic.

 

READ MORE: Heel Pain? Arch Pain? Could be...

 

Ankylosing Spondylitis

This is an arthritic condition that causes excess bone growth in the spine. Symptoms generally present with pain and stiffness in the low back and hips, but everything in our bodies is connected to something else. Unfortunately, that something else in this case is your feet. Both your Achilles tendon and your plantar fascia are at risk of being damaged by AS, which can lead to heel spurs on the back or bottom of your heel.

 

DISH

Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostasis. When we break down these words, we find that DISH is a spread out (Diffuse) pain with no identifiable cause (idiopathic) in the bones (skeletal) that involves too much growth (hyperostosis). Calcium deposits form down the sides of the upper spine and neck, but can be found as far away as the heels. Heels spurs from DISH will form on the back side of the heel and can make it difficult to wear certain shoes that rub in the affected area.

 

No matter what is causing your heel spur, the MLS pain laser can stop an active spur from growing and relieve the associated pain. Another good idea—and don’t faint when I say this—is to wear a raised heel. Not a HIGH heel, mind you, but a shoe that tilts the foot slightly forward can avoid excess pressure on the affected area. There’s no getting around it, if you suspect you may have a heel spur, you need to come see us. Your podiatrist will check for multiple causes of heel spurs and offer treatment suggestions.

 

READ MORE: Get Summer Ready Feet Today

Comments: