Blog

Posts for tag: arch support

Sandals and summer go together like peanut butter and jelly, but too many sandals don’t offer the correct support or protection and can leave your feet aching or lead to other issues. Don’t fret, there are still plenty of options out there that will make your podiatrist happy and look fashionable.

 

The key features to look for in a summer sandal are:

Arch Support – Perhaps the biggest complain podiatrists have about sandals is the lack of support. When your foot is not properly supported, it can lead or contribute to plantar fasciitis, fallen arches, and even ankle, knee, hip, and back pain. Sandals might be appropriate at times, but you should never plan on walking in them for long distances or periods of time as this can exacerbate issues.

READ MORE: Plantar Fasciitis

Toe Protection – Personally, I love showing off my toes in the summer (especially after my latest PediCare Salon visit!), but leaving your tootsies exposed can result in pain or injury. Stubbed or stepped on toes are common and can result in fractures and unsightly bruising. There is also a potential for cuts and abrasions or even sunburn. Choosing sandals with enclosed toes can eliminate some of these flip flop risks.

READ MORE: PediCare vs Pedicure

Materials – Choosing the right sandal all depends on the occasion, but you should always match the material of the sandal to your activity. If you’re going to be wearing your sandals around water, don’t choose leather, suede, canvass, or other materials that absorb water or are damaged by it. Make sure any straps are comfortable and wont rub to form blisters. Pay attention to the sole thickness as well; the shoe should not fold in half if you attempt to bend it.

Sandals fit properly only if your entire foot is resting on the footbed. If your heel hangs off the back or your smallest toe is falling off the side, you need a bigger size or a completely different sandal. Look for brands that boast the APMA seal of approval. This seal is granted only to products that have shown consistent benefits for foot and ankle health. To find brands with this approval click HERE, scroll down to shoes, flip flops/sandals and click. There are over 400 individual sandals to explore!

If you’re looking for the perfect summer sandals, the FAAWC offers Revere sandals for both men and women. The footbed is removable to fit your orthotics, meaning you’ll be looking good and keeping your feet (and your podiatrist) happy and supported.

READ MORE: Insoles vs Orthotics

Call or drop by today to browse our selection of perfect summer sandals.

 

We always think of spring as the time of new birth, but in fact August holds the prize as the month with the highest birth rate for women in the US. Since 7/10 pregnant women report foot and ankle problems, it’s a good idea to take a look at why. Ruling out all the obvious problems stemming from the massive changes going on inside your body, one culprit that we can avoid are high heels. There are a lot of myths concerning the health risk of high heels during pregnancy, but the truth is they’re not going to magically harm you, but there are risks to wearing high heels (or really any non-supportive shoe) while pregnant. There three main reasons for this:

  1. Change to the center of gravity - Women gain weight during pregnancy, this is a fact that is often over-dramatized, but even if you keep a healthy diet and exercise, the life form inside you has volume and weight so you will inevitably being getting larger and heavier. This completely changes your center of gravity, pulling you forward and resulting in extra pressure on the knees and feet. High heels will also shift a woman’s center of gravity forward, compounding the problem. If you insist on high heels, choose something very low that offers support. Your feet will thank you.

 

  1. Muscles - Lot’s of fun things happen to your leg muscles when you’re pregnant. Cramps are a common symptom of muscle fatigue due to increased body weight. Hormones released during pregnancy will loosen the muscles and ligaments in the foot, so when we use our foot muscles too much with no support (like when we wear high heels), permanent changes to the foot can occur. Wear tennis shoes with Velcro or slip on shoes with arch support. If you must wear heels, do so for short periods of time and raise your feet afterwards to reduce swelling.

 

  1. Tripping - Remember that center of gravity thing we just talked about? Not only does that tilt women forward adding pressure to their feet with every step, it also makes them unstable, which can lead to a nasty fall. Technically, this can happen to anyone wearing high heels at any time, but if you’re pregnant a fall could mean serious complications for both mother and baby. It’s best to just go with a flat and supportive shoe that keeps you firmly planted on the ground.

While high heels are not the enemy, they should be avoided as much as possible during pregnancy to protect the health of everyone involved. Your muscles need support so that your feet can keep up with your kid for years to come. 

It feels like springtime and when the weather starts warming up, people become more active and need to make different footwear choices. If you Google best footwear choices for spring you will find a litany of information on style, but very little on function. So before you go shoe shopping, keep in mind these important features.

Material

During the winter, we want heavy materials for our shoes to keep out the snow and cold, but as temperatures rise and fluctuate we should consider something better for the weather. You want to look for materials that let your foot breathe. Leather and canvas materials are best for dressy or casual occasions. On active days, find an athletic shoe that is lightweight with breathable mesh for quick sweat evaporation.

Support

Many people switch straight from snow boots to flip-flops, but too many sandals leave your feet unsupported and susceptible to foot problems. If you insist on wearing flip-flops, buy a pair that is specifically designed to protect your foot. There are plenty of fashionable choices such as the classic Birkenstock, the Tevas strappy outdoor shoes, or the many options of the very cushiony Aerosoles.

When and How to Shop

Most people don’t make a detailed plan for their trip to the shoe store, but it can save your feet a lot of pain and the hassle of a return if you can get your choices right the first time. No matter what kind of shoes you are buying, try them on later in the day after you have been active. Your feet fatigue and widen throughout the day and your shoes should still feel comfortable when your foot is at its largest. If you are shopping for multiple styles make sure you bring the appropriate sock or hose for each. If that’s how you’re going to wear it when you own it, that’s how you should try it on. Make sure you don’t walk out of the store with a pair of shoes that you haven’t walked around in first. Take at least a full lap of the store in each pair of shoes before deciding.

If you need more guidance on the best choices for your specific foot problem, visit the APMAs guide to approved products for all your foot ailments: HEREAnd of course, the staff at the FAAWC are always happy to help you with recommendations or appointments with our doctors. With the right shoe choices, you can have a new spring in your step and improved health for you feet. Happy walking everybody!