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Posts for tag: ligament injuries

        One minute you’re running down the field after the ball and in a split second your ankle twists and gives way. You fall, allowing the other team to score the winning point. Does that sound like a familiar scenario? For people dealing with ankle hypermobility, also known as weak ankles, this is a very real possibility.

What is a Sprain and Why is it Bad?

An ankle sprain occurs when the ligaments holding our ankle joint steady are stretched or torn, usually from a sudden twist such as a quick direction change or bad misstep. This can happen to anyone, but those with chronic instability will suffer repeated sprains, leaving ligaments looser each time. Cartilage and tendons are also affected by this trauma and arthritis can develop in the ankle joint. You can’t live an active lifestyle if your ankles can’t keep up.

 

READ MORE: Sprain or Strain?

 

 

Who Should Consider Surgery?

Minor sprains can be treated with RICE. Your podiatrist may also recommend physical therapy to strengthen muscles and tendons. Ankle braces should be worn for sports or any vigorous activity. If the ligament has torn completely apart, bracing and ankle exercises have not prevented further injury, or if you suffer two or more ankle sprains a year, you need to consider a surgical solution.

 

READ MORE: What is RICE?

 

The Surgery

Lateral ankle stabilization is the best approach to correct chronic ankle instability. Procedures are performed as an outpatient service (meaning you get to go home that same day) under general anesthesia. The surgeon will make an incision on the outside of the ankle over the joint. Separated or torn ligaments will be sewn together while loose but intact ligaments are shortened and tightened. The ligament is then anchored to the fibula bone using special stitches or pins. The surgeon may connect other tissues to the repaired ligament for support. The incision is then closed, and your foot is wrapped in a cast or splint.

 

Recovery

Patients will need to remain non weight-bearing with the cast or splint in place for 2 to 6 weeks, after which they will progress to a brace or walking boot. At this time, physical therapy to strengthen the ankle will begin. Patients should wear an ankle brace during sports and activities for a minimum of 6 to 12 months, though many choose to continue using it long after for added safety.

 

READ MORE: Chronic Ankle Instability

 

You should never have to sit out of the game due to chronic ankle instability or hypermobility. Ankle sprains do major damage to your joints and preventing this is the number one step in living a healthy and active lifestyle. All of the FAAWC podiatrists are board certified for Lateral Ankle Stabilization and other corrective surgeries. Talk to your podiatrist today if you are tired of persistent ankle sprains.

 

 

    There are many parts of the foot and there are equally as many ways to damage all of them. One area of concern is our ligaments. Ligaments are thin bands of fibrous tissue that connect bones together at the joints. This is not to be confused with a tendon, which connects muscle to bone. Ligaments are tight yet springy so that joints can flex and return to a natural position. When we sprain a ligament, we stretch it further than it wants to go and it gets mad at us by swelling and becoming painful.

READ MORE: Sprain or Strain?

    Sprains can come from any activity that twists the foot into an unnatural position. Twisting or rolling your ankle is the number one cause of sprained ligaments. These injuries tend to occur suddenly from a very identifiable cause such as jumping and landing on your foot wrong. The ankle is supported by four separate ligaments: the deltoid ligament, anterior talofibular ligament, posterior talofibular ligament, and the calcaneofibular ligament. (Don’t worry, we won’t quiz you on them). Any of these can be damaged or torn in a sprain.

 

    A sprain comes in three grades of severity. Grade I is mild, usually with only minor swelling and pain. You should still be able to put weight on the foot as the joint is relatively stable. Grade II is, of course, a little bit worse; usually involving an incomplete tear in one or more ligaments. The ankle may not hold weight so crutches or a splint can help with mobility and support. Grade III is reserved for the most severe ligament damage. These ligaments have torn completely apart. You will not be able to move or put weight on the joint for some time.

 

    If you suspect you have an ankle sprain, the best place to start is R.I.C.E. (rest, ice, compression, elevation). Over-the-counter pain relievers may also be used. Swelling for a Grade I injury will begin to lessen within 24 to 48 hours. If your symptoms get worse after home remedy, go see your podiatrist. Any Grade II or III injury will need medical attention for proper treatment and healing. A 2 to 4 week recovery time can be expected for minor to moderate sprains. Sprains that need casts or splinting could take up to two months for healing. When your doctor gives you the go-ahead, you’ll want to gradually increase your activity. Partially healed sprains will not be strong enough to hold the joint stable and your chances of re injury are high.

 

READ MORE: Fix Sprains Forever!

 

    Spraining ligaments isn’t hard to do, but its easy to avoid with some logical steps. Wear supportive shoes for every activity, especially sports. Strengthen your ligaments with simple exercises like ankle rolls or calf raises. While you’re sitting at your desk at work, cross your legs and use the raised foot to write the alphabet. Even if you don’t exercise your feet specifically, make sure to warm up muscles and ligaments with a good stretch before activity.

 

    If you think you have sprained a ligament in your foot or ankle, make an appointment today. We provide urgent access to our doctors if you call 740-363-4373. Seeing your podiatrist can ensure a proper healing plan and save you money over other urgent cares or emergency rooms. Don’t delay!

A long, long time ago, in a land far, far away… just kidding, it was a grade school in Ohio… I remember a friend who would suffer an ankle sprain at least once a week during recess. Many of us thought she was possibly being over-dramatic, but some people do actually suffer from chronic ankle instability, which leaves them more prone to sprain and strains than the rest of us. This affects somewhere between 10 to 20 people out of every 100 who experience ankle sprains.

Based on the most current research, this isn’t necessarily a genetic condition. Most cases occur from a previous ankle sprain injury that does not heal correctly or fully. Those who ha e a high instep/arch are more susceptible since their feet do not adapt as well to unstable terrain as those with more flexible ligaments and arches. Patients report that after an initial sprain, their ankles feel less stable and have gotten more swollen and painful. Secondary complications may occur from this, including synovitis (joint swelling), tendonitis, and tendon tears. Instability can develop from overstretched or torn ligaments that grow back together too loosely. This affects the way bones and ligaments interact, which, of course, can cause more problems.

Our bodies react through a process called proprioception, which basically means our muscles react in a predictable way based on the chemical inputs they are receiving. This is what the subconscious parts of our brain do to control all motor functions in our body. If these receptors are not firing properly for our ankles, we may feel a constant sensation of instability of coordination.

If you experience chronic ankle instability, you have several treatment options based on the severity and longevity of the problem. Many patients are able to recover stability with simple exercises and the strategic use of an ankle brace. If only an ankle brace is used, coordination and strengthening exercises may be recommended as an important part of rehabilitation. In some cases, surgery may be the best option. Even after surgery, exercises and strict adhering to a doctor’s recommendations is the best option for a full and successful recovery.

Time is of the essence here. Early recognition and early treatment will mean a shorter recovery time and better future foot health for you. If you experience chronic pain from ankle sprains or any sort of injury, please visit your podiatrist to have an evaluation. Early recognition could mean the difference between several weeks of wearing a brace and strengthening exercises and a few months of surgical recovery. I say it in almost every blog post, but pain is NOT NORMAL. If you are still experiencing complications after an ankle sprain, please go see your podiatrist and get it check out before it become a chronic problem.

Sometimes it’s hard to know exactly what’s going on inside our bodies. When we experience pain we often run to the all-knowing Google and try to diagnose ourselves (usually with a life-threatening disease), but Google can’t give you a proper examination and it certainly can’t treat whatever is ailing you. When it comes to your ankles, some basic knowledge can save you the hassle of an Internet search and start you on the road to recovery faster.

One of the most common Internet searches involving ankles is how to tell the difference between a sprain and a strain. There is an important designation so we decided we could save you the search and put all the information here in two very helpful blog posts. Today, we will look at ankle sprains.

Ligaments are bands of soft tissue that connect our bones and help them move properly. If these ligaments are stretched or torn, you have an ankle sprain. This usually happens when the foot is twisted in a sharp direction very suddenly. Sprains are classified into three degrees of severity. Grade 1 is a mild sprain with slight stretching and damage to only some of the ligament fibers. Grade 2 is a moderate sprain with partial tearing of the ligament. Grade 3 is a severe sprain with full tearing of the ligament, rendering the joint unusable.

All three grades of sprains will present with pain, bruising, and swelling. If your joint feels abnormally loose, you may have a grade 2 sprain. If you can’t use the joint at all, you may have a grade 3 sprain. Your podiatrist at the FAAWC can help diagnose the severity of your sprain.

Treatment for all three starts with RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation). Moderate sprains may require wearing a brace for a few weeks for support. Severe ligament tears may require surgery. You and your podiatrist can put together the right treatment plan for you to get you back on your feet fast.

Stay tuned next week to see why a sprain is different then a strain!