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Posts for tag: office services

September 05, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: office services   neuropathy   Events   Balance  

Join the FAAWC on Wednesday, September 26th from 3 pm to 6 pm for our Balance Challenge event.

Fatal falls are common among seniors but can be avoided with recognition and correction of the underlying problems­–balance, muscle strength, and stepping accuracy. Balance may be impacted by many things, especially foot problems such as neuropathy, which causes a loss of sensation in the feet. Knowing your risk and how you can improve your balance will go a long way toward your continuing good health.

For your enjoyment, we will have multiple stations set up around the office to test balance, strength, range of motion, and more. Participants will be evaluated while making one circuit through our testing stations. Here’s what you’ll experience:

  1. Sit and Stand Testing Station

Participants will attempt to sit down and stand up from a chair as many times as possible in 30 seconds. This exercise tests overall balance and leg strength.

 

  1. Sit and Reach Station

Participants will sit in a chair, extend one leg, and reach toward their toes. This tests balance and range of motion.

 

  1. Arm Curl Station

Participants are challenged to complete as many arm curls as possible in 30 seconds. Five-pound dumbbells will be used for the ladies and eight-pound dumbbells will be used for the men.

 

  1. Apley Scratch Test Station

Participants use one hand and attempt to touch their opposite shoulder blade (scapula) by reaching over and behind the back. This tests cardiovascular endurance.

 

  1. Step Station

Here you will stand in place and march for two minutes, trying to lift your knees each time past the level of your mid-thigh. This tests balance and the range of motion in your hips and knees.

 

  1. Airex Pad Station

The Airex pad is designed to mimic unstable surfaces, such as grass. Participants will stand on the pad to test balance and endurance.

 

  1. Hurdle Stepping

Our mini-hurdles start at 3” and go up to 1’. Participants will need to balance while stepping over as many hurdles as they can manage.

 

  1. Zig Zag Agility Ladder

The zigzag ladder tests coordination and balance through quick foot movement. Participants will step in and out of the ladder spaces while being timed.

 

  1. Lilly Pad Stepping

Navigate over our “lily pads” of varying sizes to test your balance and the accuracy of your foot placement.

In true FAAWC fashion, we will be giving away fantastic prizes, including:

  • $400 gift card to Tanger Outlets
  • $100 gift card for personal training with Dave Lewis of FitFam
  • 1-hour pedicure in our PediCare Salon
  • And more…

Prizes will be awarded at the end of the event by random drawing. Everyone participating has an equal chance of winning and your scores will not be used for awarding prizes. For those not wishing to participate in our balance challenge, you are still welcome to drop by for refreshments, tai chi demonstrations, and more fun with our FAAWC doctors and staff.

Don’t forget to join us on Wednesday, September 26th at the FAAWC from 3 pm to 6 pm!

If you see blood pooling underneath a toenail or fingernail that is accompanied by intense pain, you can have immediate relief from a podiatrist. This is called a subungual hematoma–subungual meaning “under” and hematoma meaning “blood.” When blood builds up between the nail plate and nail bed, it creates a painful and unsightly injury.

READ MORE: Finger and Toe Discoloration

Subungual hematomas can be caused in a few different ways. You might accidentally hit your nail or drop something on it. It could be the result of sudden contact in sports or the crushing of a nail when you slam your fingers in a door. This is also a common injury for runners and athletes who wear tight shoes that don’t leave enough room for the toes.

Due to the pressure caused by the buildup of blood, intense and throbbing pain are the most common symptoms of a subungual hematoma. This will always be accompanied by red or black discoloration visible under the nail plate. Subungual hematomas can also occur in conjunction with other injuries such as fractures, cuts, and bruising of the finger itself. Even without pain, if the discoloration covers more than 50% of the nail, seek medical assistance from your podiatrist.

READ MORE: Types of Broken Bones

Immediate relief of your pain is available with a single office visit. Your podiatrist will perform decompression, also known as trephination, to drain the blood and begin healing. After numbing the affected area, your doctor may use a cautery device to painlessly burn through the nail or the nail may be perforated by a large-gauge needle. Both methods will allow blood to drain, relieving pressure and pain. In severe cases with significant bleeding or injury to the nail plate, your podiatrist may choose to remove the nail to check for lacerations on the nail bed.

Podiatrists can treat injuries to the nails of the hands and the feet. If you have a subungual hematoma, call the Foot and Ankle Wellness Center today to get immediate relief for your pain!

There’s still time to take advantage of our August MLS Laser Special!

The MLS Laser offers the very latest laser treatment technology to get you back on your feet faster. Laser therapy is safe, effective, and can greatly speed healing time. LASER stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Laser therapy is a therapeutic treatment that uses light energy (photons) for tissue healing and pain reduction. The light energy penetrates deeply into damaged cells and stimulates cellular activity. As a result of exposure to the laser, the cells of tendons, ligaments, muscles and nerves, repair themselves.

Benefits of Laser Therapy:

  • Rapid pain relief
  • Strong anti-inflammatory effect
  • Timely healing of sprain & strains
  • Rapid recovery of the structural integrity of injured region
  • Rapid resolution of swollen areas
  • Immediate improvement of local blood circulation
  • Rapid repair of superficial injuries, such as wounds and ulcers


 

FAQs

What is Laser Therapy?

Laser Therapy is the use of specific wavelengths of light to treat painful and debilitating conditions. MLS Laser Therapy is a non-invasive, safe, and effective treatment modality where this light is used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and promote wound healing and soft tissue repair. The MLS laser is the only multi-wave locked system, dual wave, fully robotic laser therapy system on the market. This means deeper penetration with no heat produced allowing faster healing with no known side effects. It has been cleared with the FDA since 2009.

Why laser therapy over other forms of therapy?

Laser therapy does not require the use of drugs or surgery, there are no known side effects, and it is quick/convenient. Studies have shown that is it equal to or more effective than other forms of physical therapy. These studies were performed at many prestigious institutions including Harvard.

How does it work?

Light energy enters the damaged cells and stimulates inter-cellular activity. This reduces pain in the area and speeds recovery of the damaged cells. Once the cells recover, the healing process is complete.

What can I expect during a treatment?

MLS Laser Therapy is a painless treatment that lasts an average of 8 minutes. You may experience a comfortable sensation at the point of application. The laser is fully robotic and placed above the skin allowing the healing energy to penetrate tissue, where it interacts with various intracellular bio-molecules resulting in the restoration of normal cell function. This also enhances the body’s natural healing processes.

What do the treatments feel like?

There is little or no sensation during treatment. There is no pain associated during laser application. Laser treatment is relaxing and some people even fall asleep.

How many treatments does it take?

This depends on the nature of the condition being treated. The typical treatment protocol is between 6 and 12 visits. Conditions such as severe arthritis may require ongoing periodic care to control pain.

What can I expect after the treatment?

Most people experience positive results in 1 to 3 treatments, with the average course of treatment being 7 to 10 sessions. Swelling is greatly reduced and there is a rapid relief of pain. Acute conditions usually subside quickly, typically within one phase of treatments, while chronic conditions can be controlled with regular treatments.

The effects of MLS Laser Therapy are cumulative; therefore, expect to see improvement as you proceed through your treatment plan. It is critical that once you start, you complete the course of treatments recommended by your doctor or symptoms are likely to reoccur.

Are the results long lasting?

MLS Laser Therapy is about healing. It’s not about masking or covering up a condition. When you feel better from this therapy…it’s because you are better. Therefore, results have been found to be quite long lasting.

Can it be used in conjunction with other forms of treatment?

Yes. MLS Laser therapy is sometimes more effective when combined with other forms of therapy, including physical therapy, chiropractic, massage, soft tissue mobilization, electrotherapy, and following surgery.

How do I know if laser therapy is right for me?

We will evaluate your condition and perform a complete laser therapy examination to determine if you are a candidate for this procedure. Call us to schedule your evaluation or a consultation with one of our doctors.

 

Don’t wait to try our MLS laser! Until the end of August, receive 10% off when you pay in full. Call the FAAWC today to take advantage of the best healing technology on the market with the MLS Laser!

        One minute you’re running down the field after the ball and in a split second your ankle twists and gives way. You fall, allowing the other team to score the winning point. Does that sound like a familiar scenario? For people dealing with ankle hypermobility, also known as weak ankles, this is a very real possibility.

What is a Sprain and Why is it Bad?

An ankle sprain occurs when the ligaments holding our ankle joint steady are stretched or torn, usually from a sudden twist such as a quick direction change or bad misstep. This can happen to anyone, but those with chronic instability will suffer repeated sprains, leaving ligaments looser each time. Cartilage and tendons are also affected by this trauma and arthritis can develop in the ankle joint. You can’t live an active lifestyle if your ankles can’t keep up.

 

READ MORE: Sprain or Strain?

 

 

Who Should Consider Surgery?

Minor sprains can be treated with RICE. Your podiatrist may also recommend physical therapy to strengthen muscles and tendons. Ankle braces should be worn for sports or any vigorous activity. If the ligament has torn completely apart, bracing and ankle exercises have not prevented further injury, or if you suffer two or more ankle sprains a year, you need to consider a surgical solution.

 

READ MORE: What is RICE?

 

The Surgery

Lateral ankle stabilization is the best approach to correct chronic ankle instability. Procedures are performed as an outpatient service (meaning you get to go home that same day) under general anesthesia. The surgeon will make an incision on the outside of the ankle over the joint. Separated or torn ligaments will be sewn together while loose but intact ligaments are shortened and tightened. The ligament is then anchored to the fibula bone using special stitches or pins. The surgeon may connect other tissues to the repaired ligament for support. The incision is then closed, and your foot is wrapped in a cast or splint.

 

Recovery

Patients will need to remain non weight-bearing with the cast or splint in place for 2 to 6 weeks, after which they will progress to a brace or walking boot. At this time, physical therapy to strengthen the ankle will begin. Patients should wear an ankle brace during sports and activities for a minimum of 6 to 12 months, though many choose to continue using it long after for added safety.

 

READ MORE: Chronic Ankle Instability

 

You should never have to sit out of the game due to chronic ankle instability or hypermobility. Ankle sprains do major damage to your joints and preventing this is the number one step in living a healthy and active lifestyle. All of the FAAWC podiatrists are board certified for Lateral Ankle Stabilization and other corrective surgeries. Talk to your podiatrist today if you are tired of persistent ankle sprains.

 

 

You may have seen the title of this blog and thought of the pointed wheels worn by cowboys on their boots to urge a horse forward. Yes, those are also called spurs, but a Heel Spur is different. Your bones are constantly being repaired and strengthened by your body to keep up with the stresses of everyday activity, but when this process goes awry, it can leave odd-shaped calcium deposits on the exterior of the bone. If this happens to your heels, it's a heel spur. The deposit may be pointed and sharp or it could be flat and barely noticeable. It could cause intense pain or have no symptoms at all. Generalized pain in the heel needs to be evaluated by a podiatrist since there are many causes.

 

Plantar Fasciitis

This is one of the most common conditions associated with heel spurs. The plantar fascia is a strong band of tissue along the bottom of the foot that connects the heel bone to the toes. When the plantar fascia is damaged, your body sends a message to your heel to strengthen the bone to make up for lost support. A heel spur brought on by plantar fasciitis forms on the underside of the bone and if it becomes prominent enough, you may begin to feel it like a lump in your shoe. About 50% of all heel spurs form as a result of plantar fasciitis, according to the Mayo Clinic.

 

READ MORE: Heel Pain? Arch Pain? Could be...

 

Ankylosing Spondylitis

This is an arthritic condition that causes excess bone growth in the spine. Symptoms generally present with pain and stiffness in the low back and hips, but everything in our bodies is connected to something else. Unfortunately, that something else in this case is your feet. Both your Achilles tendon and your plantar fascia are at risk of being damaged by AS, which can lead to heel spurs on the back or bottom of your heel.

 

DISH

Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostasis. When we break down these words, we find that DISH is a spread out (Diffuse) pain with no identifiable cause (idiopathic) in the bones (skeletal) that involves too much growth (hyperostosis). Calcium deposits form down the sides of the upper spine and neck, but can be found as far away as the heels. Heels spurs from DISH will form on the back side of the heel and can make it difficult to wear certain shoes that rub in the affected area.

 

No matter what is causing your heel spur, the MLS pain laser can stop an active spur from growing and relieve the associated pain. Another good idea—and don’t faint when I say this—is to wear a raised heel. Not a HIGH heel, mind you, but a shoe that tilts the foot slightly forward can avoid excess pressure on the affected area. There’s no getting around it, if you suspect you may have a heel spur, you need to come see us. Your podiatrist will check for multiple causes of heel spurs and offer treatment suggestions.

 

READ MORE: Get Summer Ready Feet Today